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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     77000088
     [UNVERIFIED]
Type:     Greek
Region:     THRACE
City:     Dikaia
Metal:     Silver
Denomination:     Didrachm
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     BC Circa 480-450
Weight:     7.29 g
Die Axis:     5 h
Obverse Description:     Bearded head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Reverse Legend:     Δ−Ι−Κ
Reverse Description:     Head of bull left within incuse square
Primary Reference:     SchÖnert-Geiss, Bisanthe 22 var. (V2/R- [unlisted rev. die])
Reference2:     cf. May, Dikaia 28-32
Reference3:     TraitÉ II 1769-71
Reference4:     SNG Cop 551; Jameson 1055; Weber 2358
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=114511
Grade:     EF, lightly toned
Notes:     Sale: Triton XI, Lot: 88 Very rare, the second example from this obverse die of refined elegance, and among the finest known Dikaia didrachms. The other example from this obverse die is in the LÖbbecke Collection in Berlin. SchÖnert-Geiss placed that coin near the beginning of her listings of these double-relief didrachms, but it is not die linked to any of the other specimens and stylistically should be placed later. Unlike the other known dies, which have a frontal eye, this obverse die features a profile eye, suggesting it belongs near the end of this series. Overall, the dies used for this coin are arguably among the most refined, and have a style more reflective of the emerging Classical artwork of the mid 5th century.