coin project
Please support our sponsors


Log In | Register
[75807 Coins (45815 Unverified)]
 
 
Search
Advanced Search
Search By Coin ID
 
 
Home
ANCIENT/BYZANTINE
Ancient Africa (157)
Ancient East (4670)
Ancient Spain (871)
Byzantine (751)
Celtic (372)
Goths, Vandals (232)
Greek (17187)
Roman Imperial (30893)
Roman Provincial (8129)
Roman Republican & Imperatorial (2317)
MEDIEVAL/EARLY WORLD
Ancient and Medieval India (71)
Ancient and Medieval Far East (9421)
Central Europe and Italy (20)
Eastern Europe and Scandinavia (54)
Germany (30)
Islamic (18)
Western Europe (102)
MODERN WORLD
Africa (5)
Asia (0)
Australia and the Pacific Islands (0)
Europe (16)
North America (0)
South America (0)
COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS
Ancient Imitations (415)
Modern Forgeries of Ancient Coins (18)
Medieval Imitations (0)
Modern Forgeries of Medieval Coins (0)
Modern Forgeries of Modern Coins (0)
 
Submit New Coin(s)
 
Sponsors page
Terms of Service
Contact Us
About Us
FAQ Page
Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     82001056
     [UNVERIFIED]
Type:     Ancient Imitations
Issuer:     Barbarous Radiates imitating Tetricus
Date Ruled:     3rd-4th Century AD
Metal:     Silver
Denomination:     Antoninianus
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD 3rd-4th Century
Weight:     3.00 g
Die Axis:     9 h
Obverse Description:     Radiate head right
Reverse Description:     Figure, holding spear, standing right, his hand on captive to right, standing right
Primary Reference:     Unpublished
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=147512
Grade:     VF.
Notes:     Sale: CNG 82, Lot: 1056 While the obverse of this issue clearly imitates one of the Tetrici, the reverse is a novel type. There are many official issues that feature a figure holding a transverse spear, either the emperor, a soldier, Mars, or Virtus, but the accompanying captive standing to his right is unknown. The style and fabric are most similar to the barbarous radiates found in hoards deposited in Gaul. Although there are a few small issues featuring a similarly depicted Virtus with a seated captive before him, these emperor/soldier/Virtus-and-captive types are far more prevalent in Roman coinage of the 4th century AD, so it is likely that the present issue was struck in that century.