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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     812798
     [UNVERIFIED]
Type:     Ancient Imitations
Region:     Barbarous Radiates
Issuer:     Imitating Tetricus I
Metal:     Bronze
Denomination:     Antoninianus
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD Late 3rd century
Diameter:     17 mm
Weight:     1.63 g
Die Axis:     0.133333333333 h
Obverse Description:     Radiate and draped bust right
Reverse Description:     Female figure (Spes?) standing facing, holding palm and dress
Primary Reference:     Unpublished
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=124597
Grade:     Good VF, brown patina, some striking weakness
Notes:     Extremely rare with AVG in legend. There is uncertainty whether Tetricus I elevated his son, Tetricus II, from caesar to emperor in the final days of their reign in AD 274. A coin identified by Sutherland (”An Unpublished Coin in the Name of Tetricus II,” MN XI [1964]) purports to be of Tetricus II as Augustus, but the authenticity of the coin, or whether it is an blundered imitation, is debatable. The present coin is certainly from the huge issues of barbarous radiates that were struck in Gaul and Britain in the late 3rd century and later. Although the issuers of these coins attempted to imitate authentic issues, a large portion are erroneous, most commonly as hybrids of obverses of one of the Tetrici appearing with reverses of the other. While the present coin has the obverse bust of Tetricus II, the legend may have been confused with that of Tetricus I. Regardless, the appearance of AVG on any coin of Tetricus II, official or barbarous, is extremely rare.