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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     783401
     [UNVERIFIED]
Type:     Roman Provincial
Region:     MOESIA INFERIOR
City:     Nicopolis ad Istrum
Issuer:     Septimius Severus
Date Ruled:     AD 193-211
Metal:     Bronze
Denomination:     ae 26
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD 193-211
Diameter:     26 mm
Weight:     11.92 g
Die Axis:     1 h
Obverse Legend:     AVT Λ CEΠT• CEVH ΠΕΠ
Obverse Description:     , laureate head right
Reverse Legend:     VΠ AVP ΓΑΛΛΟV NIKOΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ ΠPOC ICTP, AIMOC
Reverse Description:     Mountain-god Haemus reclining right on wooded rock outcropping, resting right arm above head and cradling scepter in left arm; below, bear right, chasing leaping stag
Primary Reference:     AMNG I 1315
Reference2:     SNG Cop -
Reference3:     Varbanov (second ed.) 2721
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=99732
Grade:     EF, attractive dark green patina with blue-green overtones
Notes:     Very rare. Haemus, the son of Boreas, was a mythological king of Thrace. Vain and haughty, he boastfully compared himself and his wife Queen Rhodope to Zeus and Hera. For this vainglorious presumption, Haemus and Rhodope were transformed into local mountains. Sometimes, the Greeks called the entire Balkan Peninsula the CersonhsoV tou Aimou, Haemus’ Peninsula.