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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     783953
     [UNVERIFIED]
Type:     GREEK
Region:     SICILY
City:     Entella
Issuer:     Punic issues
Date Ruled:     Circa 345/38-320/15 BC
Metal:     Silver
Denomination:     Tetradrachm
Date Struck:     BC Circa 345/38-320/15
Diameter:     25 mm
Weight:     16.93 g
Die Axis:     8 h
Obverse Description:     Head of Persephone left, wearing barley-ear wreath, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; three dolphins around, pellet to left
Reverse Description:     Horse walking right in front of palm tree
Primary Reference:     Jenkins, Punic 128 (O43/R115)
Reference2:     SNG Lloyd 1614 (same obv. die)
Reference3:     SNG Cop 83 (same obv. die)
Reference4:     SNG Lockett 1035 = Pozzi 3296 (same obv. die)
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=99625
Grade:     EF, minor die break at top of obverse, hairline flan crack.
Notes:     From the Semon Lipcer Collection.In the final decade of the 5th century BC the Carthaginians launched a series of invasions of Sicily, conquering much of the western half of the island and bringing devastation to many formerly flourishing Greek communities. The Punic presence lasted for a century and a half, until Rome's victory in the First Punic War obliged them to withdraw. During their time of occupation, the Carthaginians struck an extensive coinage in Sicily for the purpose of financing their military operations and the maintenance of garrisons. The obverse and reverse types of the series are mostly influenced by Sicilian prototypes, particularly those of Syracuse, except for the later series with the head of Herakles on the obverse which was obviously influenced by the well-recognized coinage of Alexander the Great. While a few of the series are struck at cities with established mints, such as Motya and Panormos, these are often viewed as minor or campaign mints that operated for a short duration. The location of the primary Punic mint (or mints) on Sicily, responsible for the large issues studied by G.K. Jenkins (’Carthage’ series I-V), has been the subject of great debate. Most recently I. Lee surveyed the preexisting literature and took a fresh look at the full spectrum of evidence, persuasively concluding that this mint was located at Entella (”Entella: The Silver Coinage of the Campanian Mercenaries and the First Carthaginian Mint 410-409 BC”, NC 2000).