coin project
Please support our sponsors


Log In | Register
[83516 Coins (44231 Unverified)]
 
 
Search
Advanced Search
Search By Coin ID
 
 
Home
ANCIENT/BYZANTINE
Ancient Africa (157)
Ancient East (4671)
Ancient Spain (872)
Byzantine (753)
Celtic (372)
Goths, Vandals (259)
Greek (22299)
Roman Imperial (32424)
Roman Provincial (8276)
Roman Republican & Imperatorial (2318)
MEDIEVAL/EARLY WORLD
Ancient and Medieval India (71)
Ancient and Medieval Far East (10245)
Central Europe and Italy (20)
Eastern Europe and Scandinavia (54)
Germany (30)
Islamic (18)
Western Europe (102)
MODERN WORLD
Africa (5)
Asia (0)
Australia and the Pacific Islands (0)
Europe (17)
North America (0)
South America (0)
COUNTERFEITS AND IMITATIONS
Ancient Imitations (444)
Modern Forgeries of Ancient Coins (19)
Medieval Imitations (0)
Modern Forgeries of Medieval Coins (0)
Modern Forgeries of Modern Coins (0)
 
Submit New Coin(s)
 
Sponsors page
Terms of Service
Contact Us
About Us
FAQ Page
Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     1650258
Type:     Roman Imperial
Issuer:     Lucilla
Date Ruled:     AD 164-183
Metal:     Gold
Denomination:     Aureus
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD 164-169
Diameter:     18 mm
Weight:     6.08 g
Obverse Legend:     LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Obverse Description:     Draped bust right
Reverse Legend:     V_E_NVS
Reverse Description:     Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, and sceptre in left
Mint:     Rome
Primary Reference:     RIC III 0783 (M. Aurelius)
Reference2:     Cohen 69
Photograph Credit:     Classical Numismatic Group
Source:     http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=105754
Grade:     Good VF, edges rounded for jewelry.
Notes:     Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucilla was one of thirteen children of Marcus Aurelius, of whom only five outlived their father (including, unfortunately, the future emperor Commodus). Lucilla married the co-emperor Lucius Verus in 164, and after his death in 169 was married against her will to Pompeianus, consul and ally of her father. Despite any personal unhappiness, Lucilla became concerned about her brother’s increasing irrationality (and perhaps jealous of her decreasing influence at court) and joined in a conspiracy to assassinate Commodus and replace him with Pompeianus. The attempt failed in 182, and Lucilla and her family were exiled to the island of Capri, where they were quietly executed.