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Coin Detail
Click here to see enlarged image.
ID:     58_Julian_SER_ARL_2
Type:     Ancient Imitations
Region:     Western Europe or Gaul
Issuer:     Imitation Julian II
Metal:     Bronze
Denomination:     AE 2-sized copy of AE 1
Struck / Cast:     struck
Date Struck:     AD c 360-365
Diameter:     22 mm
Weight:     3.37 g
Die Axis:     6 h
Obverse Legend:     D N FL CL IVLIA_NVS P F AVG
Obverse Description:     Pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse Legend:     SECVRITAS REI PVB
Reverse Description:     Bull, head facing, standing right; two stars above; to right, eagle standing right on wreath, with head to left holding wreath in beak
Mint Mark:     PCONST
Mint:     Unknown - unoffical - copy of Arles
Primary Reference:     Prototype: RIC VIII, Arles 318-323
Reference2:     Prototype: LRBC 468, 9
Reference3:     Prototype: Cf. SR 88 4073
Reference4:     Prototype: VM 25
Photograph Credit:     Mark Lehman
Source:     McCollum Collection
Notes:     This is the most "believable" contemporary copy of a Julian AE1 I have ever seen. In discussions with other numismatists and dealers, the theory was advanced that these may have actually been made at Arles, but unofficially - or that an Imperial celator cut the dies. Julian, of course, issued no AE2's, but Arles wass in the area which was in sympathy with Julian's pagan orientation - and so these may have circulated alongside the issues of Jovian and the early Valentinian dynasty - the portrait looks more like a member of Valentinian's clan than Julian.